Enlightenment Series Review

Review:

The Enlightenment series, by Joanna Chambers, is an entertaining m/m romance trilogy set mainly in 1820s Edinburgh. Although the covers are a little more in-your-face than I like (thank goodness for Kindles!), the series caught my attention because of its strong reviews on Goodreads, and despite some mixed feelings in book one, I ended up enjoying it quite a bit.

The main character is David Lauriston, an up-and-coming lawyer from a farming family. Although he lacks the family connections and personal wealth of many successful men of his profession, his strong work ethic and intelligence catch the eye of a prominent Edinburgh lawyer who becomes his mentor and friend. Unbeknownst to his coworkers, however, David’s workaholism is partially to keep himself too busy to give in to his illicit attraction to other men. Raised in a religious family, David is full of self-loathing for his “unnatural” desires, and drinks too much in an attempt to dull the shame and guilt he feels for his periodic “lapses.”

This all starts to change when he meets Lord Murdo Balfour, the handsome and wealthy younger son of an Earl, who is as unapologetic about his homosexuality as David is tormented. After a chance meeting at an inn, they are unexpectedly thrown together again in Edinburgh. Though Murdo prefers to avoid “repeat performances” and David prefers to avoid sexual encounters with other men completely, the two find themselves unable to deny their growing attraction to each other.

Like One Indulgence, the Enlightenment series is a fairly typical Regency(ish) romance, just with two men instead of a man and a woman. The sex scenes were steamy and well-written, but as I mentioned above, I was a little conflicted about the romance in the first book, because Murdo behaved a bit too much like a standard romance hero for my taste – too mercurial and prone to acting angry and even aggressive over things that would have resulted in less angst and fewer misunderstandings for all if they’d just been talked out calmly. (To be fair, David’s tendency to put his foot in his mouth when trying to discuss anything resembling feelings and relationships with other men couldn’t have helped.) However, Murdo mellowed out in the second and third books and showed a more vulnerable side, and I found them more enjoyable.

All three books have interesting subplots concerning the social and political changes of the time, as well as actual historical events of the period. I found the second book’s portrayal of King George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822 to be especially interesting, and also enjoyed the subplots involving Elizabeth Chalmers, the daughter of David’s mentor.

Trigger warning (click to view): The series does contain depictions of period-typical homophobia, m/f spouse abuse, and references to past rape.

My rating:3.5 Stars (3.5 / 5)

Brave Movie Review

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Review:

The first Pixar movie with a female protagonist, which is slightly depressing given that it’s also the 13th Pixar movie. At least it’s a fun, strong-minded, and memorable female protagonist!

Merida feels misunderstood by her proper and traditional mother, so she makes a wish that inadvertently turns her mother into a bear. Oops.

The quest to undo it is a rollicking good adventure with much for girls, boys, and their parents to enjoy. Beautiful animation as well, especially Merida’s amazing hair.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

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