Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife With Native Plants Book Review

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Review:

After attending a very enjoyable lecture by Dr. Douglas W. Tallamy, a professor of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, I immediately bought his book, Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife With Native Plants.

I am not sure that I could credit Dr. Tallamy or his book with any genuinely new ideas, but what he has done is provided an extraordinarily readable, thorough, and convincing synthesis of a number of principles that natural and wildlife gardeners have promoted for years. Bringing Nature Home is a must read for anyone serious about attracting backyard wildlife.

Dr. Tallamy writes passionately of the importance of sustaining biodiversity in the United States and around the world. After a rather grim and depressing outline of the many extinct and imperiled plant and animal species we have lost to development and other factors, Dr. Tallamy points out that there is still much room for hope, and it lies primarily in the hands of gardeners.

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The Vegetable Gardener’s Container Bible: How to Grow a Bounty of Food in Pots, Tubs, and Other Containers

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Review:

Want to read

Since The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible is so excellent, and I’m temporarily stuck in an apartment, I’ve been meaning to read this book to learn more about container gardening.

The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible Book Review

Review:

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Disclosure: My parents received a copy of the original edition of The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible, 2nd Edition: Discover Ed’s High-Yield W-O-R-D System for All North American Gardening Regions: Wide Rows, Organic Methods, Raised Beds, Deep Soil free of charge due to an acquaintance in the author’s family.

My parents get a significant amount of their produce every year from their large organic vegetable garden, and they’ve been gardening for a combined total of something like 70 or 80 years, so they didn’t expect to learn much when they were given a free copy of this book and I wouldn’t say that they did. However, the information in the book is so clear, comprehensive, and well organized that it’s become one of their go-to reference books, and they gave me a copy when I moved out of the house and started a garden of my own. As a relative beginner (I helped with bed preparation, weeding, watering, and harvesting growing up, but not so much with planning, seed starting, or pest control), this book was absolutely indispensable.

If you are a beginning vegetable gardener, The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible, 2nd Edition: Discover Ed’s High-Yield W-O-R-D System for All North American Gardening Regions: Wide Rows, Organic Methods, Raised Beds, Deep Soil is the single best book I know of to get you started. Even if you don’t intend to follow organic methods exclusively, it will teach you a lot about how to prepare and plant your garden to reduce the labor and cost of fighting pests and weeds and build healthy soil (which in turn produces more nutritious vegetables). If you are already experienced, like my parents, maybe check it out from the library first to see what you think, and get it if you think it will be a good reference for you

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies

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Review:

Want to read

The Xerces Society website is an outstanding resource for information on pollinator-friendly gardening, landscaping, and farming, so I’m eager to read this book.

Covering Ground Book Review

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Review:

One of my favorite gardening books – beautiful and inspirational photos and in-depth information about attractive groundcover options for virtually any garden situation you could come across, from salty, sandy seashores to hot, dry slopes.

My only complaint is that I’d like a little more info about which plants are edible for humans or provide food, nectar, or habitat for wildlife, but that’s a personal preference.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

Perennial Vegetables: From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, A Gardener’s Guide to Over 100 Delicious and Easy to Grow Edibles

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Review:

Want to read

Eric Toensmeier is one of the leading experts on perennial edible crops and I’m eager to read this book to get ideas for my own garden.

Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set) Book Review

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Review:

This is the bible of edible forest gardening in temperate North America. Pricey, but absolutely worth the splurge.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide To Home-Scale Permaculture Book Review

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Review:

This book changed my life. Though I’ve always been interested in gardening, sustainability, and the connectedness of the two, I’d never seen that connectedness communicated so clearly and effectively. This book synthesized a lot of ideas that had been bouncing around in my head for years and organized them into a practical course of action.

If you’re familiar with the basic concept of permaculture and want to learn more about it, this is the best all-around introduction to the topic I’ve read so far, especially for North American gardeners. More advanced permaculturists may prefer something more in depth.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

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