Pride and Prejudice Book Review

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Review:

It’s probably safe to call Pride and Prejudice my favorite novel. It comes down to Pride and Prejudice vs Middlemarch, but while I consider Middlemarch to be the slightly better novel, I’ve read P&P a lot more times. And watched the BBC adaptation a lot more times, as well as most of the other film adaptations, including the modern AU, the weird black & white one with the 1840s fashion and the totally OOC Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and the Bollywood version.

I get that it’s a totally predictable and boring choice for favorite book, but it really is just that good. And I don’t just mean the romance, although the romance is obviously wonderful. Jane Austen was freaking hilarious and an extremely astute observer of life, so even if you don’t like romance in general, you should give this book a try for the satire.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

Middlemarch Miniseries Review

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Review:

Adapting a novel as rich and multilayered as Middlemarch is a feat that, honestly, I might not have thought possible, but this 6 hour miniseries did a surprisingly good job. It makes a well-acted and enjoyable introduction to the story for those unfamiliar with it, and a pleasant accompaniment for fans of the novel.

However, it certainly doesn’t substitute for reading the book! Naturally, some subplots had to be trimmed or cut entirely and the miniseries never achieves the remarkable psychological depth of the novel, especially with some of the more unlikable characters. Casaubon, in particular, suffers – reading the book, you dislike him but you understand and even pity him to some degree. In the miniseries, you’re stuck at dislike and this makes it harder to understand Dorothea and her choices as well.

The biggest failure of the miniseries is the characterization of Rosamond Vincy, who becomes, of all things, weepy. The Rosamond of the novel could crush that pathetic and annoying creature like a bug. (And probably would!) Most of the other portrayals are pretty true to character, however, and several of the casting choices, most notably Rufus Sewell as Will Ladislaw, were absolutely inspired. This film was my introduction to Sewell’s work and I’ve been a fan ever since.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

Middlemarch Book Review

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Review:

Middlemarch gets my vote for the best English language novel ever written, and possibly my favorite as well. It comes down to Middlemarch vs Pride and Prejudice and I can never choose. Middlemarch is longer and more challenging than Pride and Prejudice, so I haven’t read it as many times, but although not openly satirical or as sharp-tongued as Austen, Eliot shares both Austen’s wit and her deep and nuanced understanding of the foibles of human nature. At the same time, Eliot’s novel is much further-reaching than Austen’s. Middlemarch is subtitled “A Study of Provincial Life” and unlike Austen, who confines her pen largely to provincial gentry and their romantic and financial entanglements, Eliot lays out the whole life of a small English town in the 1830s, from gentry to vagrants and everyone in between. The psychological realism she achieved is remarkable, especially considering the field of psychology barely existed at the time the book was published, and despite the very different world her characters inhabit, you will recognize them as well as if they were your next-door neighbors (indeed, it’s quite possible that some of them are), and grow to care deeply about them.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

 

Hawaii Five-0, Season 1 Review

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Review:

This reboot of the classic 70’s show Hawaii Five-O had major issues with excessive product placement and glamorizing police brutality from the start, but it was fun enough to overlook the problems for awhile. Unfortunately, towards the end of season one, there were several plot developments that annoyed me to the point that I never returned to the show for season two and season one remains the only season of the show that I’ve watched.

But, issues aside, Hawaii Five-0 really was fun, and there were a couple episodes that rank pretty high on my list of most entertaining individual episodes of television that I’ve ever seen, so if you’re looking for some slick, shiny, action-packed entertainment, you could do a heck of a lot worse. The eye candy is also ridiculous. The Hawaiian scenery is so gorgeous that it might as well be an advertisement for the Hawaiian tourism bureau, and the cast….

Well, let’s just all thank God for Alex O’Loughlin’s willingness to take off his shirt and leave it at that. Daniel Dae Kim, Scott Caan, and Grace Park round out the main cast and they aren’t exactly painful to look at either.

As someone who loves a good Bickering Couple, the relationship between O’Loughlin’s Steve McGarrett and Scott Caan’s Danny “Danno” Williams was also a major highlight of the show. It only takes a couple episodes for them to go from wanting to punch each other in the face to full-on heterosexual life partnerhood, complete with Danno drawing hearts in the air at Steve as he’s being taken away after an injury. I am not even kidding. Watch this:

It’s worth watching the show for their carguments alone. In fact, their bromance was so blindingly obvious even CBS got in on the fun:

My rating:3.5 Stars (3.5 / 5)

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy Book Review

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Review:

I have social anxiety. Not terrible social anxiety, but bad enough that it’s definitely had a negative impact on my life. I also have periodic issues with depression, mostly of the chronic low-grade variety, although I’ve had a few episodes that were worse. Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, by David Burns, was recommended to me by a psychologist friend when I asked for help after I started getting panic attacks after certain social situations, and I can honestly say it’s changed my life. Alas, it hasn’t cured me. I doubt there is a true cure, though a therapist might be able to make additional progress. But – and this is still a significant benefit and improvement in my quality of life – I haven’t had a panic attack since first reading the book in 2011, nor have I had one of my deeper depressive episodes. I still feel awkward in many social situations, but I’ve caught myself being braver, and less avoidant of them, and I beat myself up less afterwards for perceived mistakes. Again, not cured, but noticeably better.

Burns is one of the developers of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, a form of psychotherapy that’s well supported by clinical trials for its effectiveness in treating, anxiety disorders, depression, and a number of other conditions. As someone with an internal voice that tends to be self-deprecating and sarcastic at best and cruel and unreasonable at worst, I found the concept of cognitive distortions especially helpful as a kind of mental structure to help me recognize when I was undermining good feelings and exaggerating mistakes. Even simply being able to recognize and label negative thought patterns has been really helpful in reducing both their frequency and their effect on my mental state.

I re-read it periodically as a sort of inoculation against trouble. If you suffer from anxiety or depression like me, I highly recommend it. It may not be an adequate substitute for seeing a therapist in person, but it’s a big step in the right direction if you need help.

IMPORTANT!

If you’ve stumbled on this review and you need urgent help, skip the book and call 911 or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1 (800) 273-8255. If you’re not in the US, check out this list of international suicide prevention hotlines.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

Earth Then and Now Book Review

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Review:

Here’s a book that really demonstrates the truth of the old adage, a picture is worth a thousand words. Earth Then and Now: Amazing Images of Our Changing World, by Fred Pearce is an eye-opening collection of before and after photographs demonstrating the startling ways the world has changed in the last 200 years. The book is divided into six sections:

  • Environmental Change – dealing mainly with the effects of climate change, pollution, and natural disasters
  • Urbanization – before and after photos of cities
  • Land Transformation – photos of dams, deforestation, mining and resource extraction, urban renewal, and more
  • Forces of Nature – photos of volcanoes, tsunamis, earthquakes, avalanches, hurricanes, and more
  • War and Conflict – before and after photos of war zones, including images of both destruction and recovery
  • Leisure and Culture – a variety of images, including restored archaeological remains, various major construction projects, and much more

A very interesting book to browse through.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

Baked Ziti With Spinach and Tomatoes Recipe Review

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 pound hot Italian sausages, casings removed
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 3 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 28-ounce can diced peeled tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup pesto sauce
  • 10 ounces ziti or penne pasta (about 3 cups), freshly cooked
  • 8 cups spinach leaves
  • 6 ounces mozzarella cheese, cubed
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese (about 3 ounces)

For directions, visit Epicurious.

Recipe Notes:

I almost always substitute 1 pound of sliced mushrooms (white or baby bella are my favorites) for the sausage and make this into vegetarian dish. Sometimes I make it with both mushrooms and sausage. I’ve also substituted cubed eggplant with delicious results.

I usually use frozen spinach, because I’m more likely to have it around the house.

Recipe Review:

Since stumbling on this recipe on Epicurious years ago, this has become a favorite dinner of my husband and me. It’s delicious, easy to make, and fairly healthy. I especially like the addition of the pesto.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)

 

Corelli’s Mandolin Book Review

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Review:

Corelli’s Mandolin is one of my favorite novels to pick up and get lost in. Set in World War 2 era Greece, it tells the story of a young Greek woman named Pelagia who falls in love with an Italian soldier and mandolinist.

I was a little slow to get into the novel, because it’s written in a somewhat rambly and discursive style that tends to wander off on tangents a lot and change styles at random. You’ll see what I mean immediately, with the charming third person first chapter and the second chapter that’s essentially a monologue in print (and ends with a dead cat, which almost made me put the book down right there). However, once you get past the initial chaos, the charming wins out. When there are no dead cats and crazy Duces involved, de Bernieres writes beautiful prose, with a lot of vividness and wit (often to the point of laughing out loud) that sucks you into the story and makes it come alive.

The ending was disappointing compared to the rest of the book, but not to the point of ruining it. However, you will want to skip the beautifully shot but horribly miscast (and, frankly, just all around butchered) film version of the book.

My rating:4.5 Stars (4.5 / 5)

Supernatural Rec List

 

Despite my rather bitter break-up with Supernatural, I still have pretty fond memories of my time in the Supernatural fandom, which produced (and is probably still producing) so much great fanfiction.

I read primarily gen in the Supernatural fandom, as I’m not and never have been a Wincest shipper. However, Wincest made up such a huge percentage of the fic that was produced during my time in the fandom that it was basically impossible to avoid, so I have some Wincest recs despite not really getting it as a ship. I left the fandom before Dean/Castiel got really popular and don’t remember ever reading any, though I might have. As far as other ships are concerned, I like Sam/Jess and several Girl of the Week ships, especially Sam/Sarah from “Provenance.”

My favorite genres in SPN fanfiction include casefiles, humor, and outside POVs (including crossovers). Because I stopped watching partway through season five, some of these fics will have been Jossed by later developments.

I’ve got over 100 bookmarks of SPN fanfiction alone, so it may take me awhile to sort through all of them to add to this post. Be sure to check back for updates as I add more!

For wincest and het recs, please check the Supernatural tag on my fanfic rec blog.

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Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova Book Review

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Review:

Anna Akhmatova has been one of my favorite poets since discovering her in my college Russian classes. She had a wonderful gift for lyric poetry and in her youth, her poems were sheer beauty. Her mature poems, on the other hand, are both beautiful and gut-wrenching, for Akhmatova lived through several of the most dangerous and turbulent periods of Russian history, including the Russian Revolution and Stalin’s purges. Her ex-husband, Nikolai Gumilev (also a poet), was shot in 1921 for suspected anti-Bolshevist activity, her common law husband Nikolai Punin was arrested repeatedly and eventually died in the Gulag, and her son Lev (by Gumilev) was also arrested during Stalin’s purges. Many of her close friends and associates, including Gorky, Mandelstam, Tsvetaeva, Mayakovsky, and Esenin, were also killed or committed suicide.

These experiences gave weight to what is, in my opinion, her greatest poem, Requiem. An excerpt:

You should have been shown, you mocker,
Minion of all your friends,
Gay little sinner of Tsarskoye Selo,
What would happen in your life –
How three-hundredth in line, with a parcel,
You would stand by the Kresty prison,
Your fiery tears
Burning through the New Year’s ice.
Over there the prison poplar bends,
And there’s no sound – and over there how many
innocent lives are ending now…

I gave my copy of The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova to my brother when we moved and kept Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova because Selected Poems is dual-language in Russian and English, while the Complete Poems is English-only. The English translations, by Judith Hemschemeyer in both books, are accurate in meaning and strive valiantly for the beauty and lyricism of Akhmatova’s words, but of course, nothing can compare to the original, so I kept the smaller volume because it has most of my favorite poems anyway (“Poem Without a Hero” is the most notable omission) and I wanted to have both English and Russian versions of her poems together. As a student of Russian, it’s good practice. If you don’t read any Russian, you may prefer the Complete Poems.

My rating:5 Stars (5 / 5)