Boys (Jongens) Movie Review

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Review:

Boys (Jongens) stars Gijs Blom as Sieger, a 15 year old track star living with his widowed father and troubled older brother. When Sieger is selected to run in a championship relay race, he is teamed with free-spirited Marc (Ko Zandvliet) and falls in love. He struggles with accepting his newly realized sexuality and with his attempts to keep the peace between his father and brother, but ultimately this is a truly sweet and uplifting coming of age story about first love, and I highly recommend it for teens and adults alike.

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Back To the Future Movie Review

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Review:

Would you believe that I’m over 30 years old and I had never seen this movie? In honor of Back to the Future day (October 21, 2015) the other day, I finally decided to remedy that, and was really pleasantly surprised. I kind of expected the movie to be corny and/or have terrible special effects, but I ended up enjoying it a lot. The story held my interest from beginning to end and there were some extremely funny lines. (Two days later, I’m still occasionally bursting into random giggles over “it’s already mutated into human form!” and “better get used to those bars, kid.”) The special effects definitely weren’t up to modern standards, but they weren’t terrible or silly looking like some older movies either.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

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The Martian Movie Review

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Review:

Topping my list of 5 Movies I’m Looking Forward To Seeing This Fall was The Martian, based on Andy Weir’s novel of the same name, which has been one of my favorite reads of 2015 so far. (Check out my review.) And I didn’t waste any time going to see it!

The Martian is the best space movie I’ve seen since Apollo 13, and it’s very similar in theme. There’s no human antagonist in this film, only the harsh realities of outer space, which Mark, his fellow Ares mission crew members, and scientists from around the world must struggle against in order to, in the words of the film’s tagline, Bring Him Home. Like Apollo 13, it’s full of really smart, competent people being really smart and competent. The science is quite a bit less detailed than the book (and there are fewer disasters and near disasters), but there’s more than enough to get a feel for it without overwhelming the audience with exposition dumps. Despite going in knowing the story, I thought the film did a great job of keeping the tension high.

The cast is amazing. Matt Damon as Mark Watney obviously has the largest role, but the supporting cast is also full of outstanding actors, including Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Jeff Daniels, Sean Bean, Sebastian Stan, Kate Mara, Michael Pena, Donald Glover, and more, to the point that a bunch of them actually felt underutilized. I really appreciated how diverse the film was, with many women and characters of color presented casually and without comment as skilled and respected scientists and leaders.

Although I thought the other five members of the Ares crew (Chastain, Stan, Mara, Pena, and Aksel Hennie) were among the most underutilized as actors, they did provide much of the film’s emotional depth and heart. The mutual friendship and respect they all shared with Mark was palpable and resulted in several powerful and emotional scenes as they confronted together the possibility that he might not survive. At the same time, they weren’t afraid to tease each other. Pilot Rick Martinez (Pena)’s first message to Mark after the crew discovered that he’d survived was especially funny, and Mark’s distaste for Commander Melissa Lewis (Chastain)’s love of disco music made for a great running joke.

Most importantly, I hope this film is a huge hit because after spending trillions on wars over the last decade and a half, I’d really like to see the next decade and a half spend money on things that actually move humanity forward, like science and space exploration. A manned Mars mission? Would be awesome. And though the movie is unflinching about the harshness of life on Mars (and the book even more so), it’s impossible not to look at the amazing Martian landscapes (actually Jordan’s Wadi Rum) and not want humanity to someday set foot there. So go forth, watch this film and be inspired!

Note: this review is for the standard version – I hate how dark 3-D films are and avoid watching them whenever possible.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)


 

5 Movies I’m Looking Forward To This Fall (plus a bonus Maybe)

Now that I’m finally making it to see movies in theaters a little more often, I’ve started paying more attention to upcoming films again. Here are five movies that I’m hoping to see this fall:

The Martian – October 2

This film, about an astronaut who gets stranded on Mars after his mission gets aborted, probably would have been on my to watch list anyway due to the cast, which includes Matt Damon, Jessica Chastain, and Sebastian Stan, but I also read the novel by Andy Weir over the summer and really enjoyed it (check out my review). Based on the trailer, it looks like it’s likely to be a serious contender for Oscars in several categories. I’ve also enjoyed the clever viral marketing campaign, which has included releasing “archival” footage from the astronauts’ preparation for their trip and a video by nerd god Neil Degrasse Tyson. See the Ares:live YouTube channel for more.

Edit: watched it!

Suffragette – October 30

With elections coming around the corner again next year, it never hurts to be reminded that women weren’t “given” the right to vote, we fought, bled, and died for it. This film stars Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, and screen goddess Meryl Streep (as Emmeline Pankhurst no less), so it’s guaranteed to be well-acted.

If this movie looks appealing to you, too, be sure to also check out the American side of things in Iron Jawed Angels.

Less than 100 years, people. There are people still alive today who were born before women could legally vote. Don’t take it for granted!

Okay, mini political rant over. Seriously, though. VOTE.

Brooklyn – November 6

It’s no secret that I’m a sucker for period dramas (and also Irish accents, I won’t lie). This one, about an Irish immigrant girl in New York in the 50’s, looks sweet and is already getting great reviews.

Legend – November 25

This trailer for a biopic of London gangsters Reggie and Ronnie Kray caught my attention because Tom Hardy. TWO Tom Hardys, in fact, and if that’s not a win-win situation, I don’t know what is! The action scenes also looked great – as I’ve mentioned before, I like hand-to-hand fight scenes much more than gunfights in general.

I am not as fond of gangster movies as my husband (whose favorite movies include The Godfather trilogy, Pulp Fiction, and Goodfellas) and I don’t know much about the Kray twins, but I think this one will be worth watching.

The Good Dinosaur – November 25

Two Pixar movies in one year? Heck yeah, baby!

Bonus: One Movie I Might Want To See

Crimson Peak – October 16

As I mentioned above in my comments about Legend, gangster movies aren’t really my thing, but I appreciate a good one, so I do watch ones that look good. Horror movies really, really aren’t my thing, and it takes a lot to get me to even try them, let alone sit through one to the end.

However, I do slightly better with gothic horror than other types, and this trailer had a genuinely creepy gothic vibe that came off sort of The Sixth Sense meets Rebecca, which piqued a certain wary interest in me, compounded by the cast, which includes Tom Hiddleston, Jessica Chastain (busy year, Jessica!), and Mia Wasikowska. If the reviews are good, I’ll probably give this film a shot, though I’ll definitely have to drag my husband along so I can climb into his lap if necessary! (Yes, I am a certified wimp – it’s why I don’t usually do horror.)

Ricki and the Flash Movie Review

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Review:

Meryl Streep’s latest is not her greatest, but she is, as usual, a joy to watch. In Ricki and the Flash, Streep stars as a former housewife who left her husband Pete (Kevin Kline) and children Julie, Josh, and Adam to pursue dreams of rock stardom. Years later, her children are grown, her husband is remarried, and she’s making ends meet by working as a grocery store clerk while singing in bars with her boyfriend Greg (Rick Springfield) and their cover band The Flash. Then Julie (Streep’s real-life daughter Mamie Gummer) attempts to commit suicide following a divorce, and Pete calls her home to try and help.

The acting was really top notch throughout. You expect excellence from actors like Streep and Kline, but I was pleasantly surprised by how well Mamie Gummer and Rick Springfield held their own, having expected them to be overshadowed by the famous pair at the top of the billings. The other standout in the cast was Audra McDonald as Maureen, Pete’s new wife and the children’s second mother. She had an outstanding confrontation with Ricki that was probably the single best acted scene in the film.

On the other hand, Sebastian Stan (of the Captain America films) and Nick Westrate (of TURN: Washington’s Spies) were both underutilized as Ricki’s sons Josh and Adam, respectively. I’m admittedly a fan of Sebastian, but I would have liked to see a little more of his character in particular. Of the three kids, he was outwardly the least embittered, but I did not get the impression that Julie was lying when she said he didn’t want Ricki at his wedding, so it might have been interesting to see that tension explored a little more. I couldn’t get a great handle on Josh’s fiancee Emily (Hailey Gates) either. She was clearly intensely uncomfortable with Ricki’s sudden arrival in her life, but I couldn’t tell if some of her behavior at the wedding was supposed to be discomfort or an alarming slide into Bridezilla-ness.

Written by Diablo Cody of Juno fame, there was lots of clever and snappy dialogue (fortunately it was also, for the most part, less precious than Juno‘s) and lots of laugh out loud moments despite the heavy themes the film touches on. I thought it handled the heavy issues regarding regrets, absentee parents, and abandonment issues relatively well for most of the film. Greg had an especially good line: “It doesn’t matter if your kids love you or not. It’s not their job to love you, it’s your job to love them!” However, I thought the ending felt too pat and simplistic. I suppose it was supposed to be some sort of “music brings people together” message, which may be true, but also sits a little uncomfortably in a film about a family literally torn apart by music.

Speaking of music, the soundtrack is a fantastic mix of classic rock and more modern hits, though I have to say I was disappointed when the film cut away from Streep’s rendition of Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” about 30 seconds in. (The full version is available on the film’s soundtrack.)

Overall, an enjoyable film, but not as memorable as it should have been, given its cast.

My rating:3 Stars (3 / 5)

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Apollo 13 Movie Review

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Review:

Tom Hanks has had an almost universally stellar career, but he was knocking it out of the park even more than usual in the mid-90s. Philadelphia in ’93, Forrest Gump in ’94, and Apollo 13 in ’95 – outstanding!

Based on the true story of the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission in 1970, this film, which also stars Kevin Bacon, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris, and Bill Paxton, remains one of the most gripping and moving films about outer space ever made. The performances are outstanding throughout. I find it especially inspiring as a tribute to the power of human ingenuity to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles, but it also has a great deal to say about the power of the human spirit.

My rating:4.5 Stars (4.5 / 5)

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Ant-Man Movie Review

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Review:

This review contains minor spoilers.

Marvel’s latest film, Ant-man, is formulaic and predictable (even down to some of the lines of dialogue), but entertaining. Like many Marvel films, it is at its best during its humorous moments and action sequences. I especially enjoyed the final fight between Ant-man and Yellowjacket, which made clever use of a child’s train set. The use of the actual ants was also pretty cool.

Some of the other scenes were too talky (sadly, Peggy Carter’s brief appearance was among these) and the occasional attempts at emotional depth were fails all around. Frankly, I never felt attached enough to any of the characters to care about the emotional pain they felt over their dead/imperiled/estranged wives and daughters. Yawn.

The romance, such as it was, was tacked on to a degree that was actually ridiculous. Coming so fast on the heels of the disastrous Bruce/Natasha in Age of Ultron, I’m tempted to say that Marvel should just give up on romance entirely – its best films, including Captain America: The Winter Soldier and The Avengers, are notable for having little or no romance at all. Though I am fond of Tony/Pepper and Steve/Peggy, nearly all of Marvel’s most interesting and best-written relationships are canonically platonic friendships (i.e. Steve & Bucky, Clint & Natasha, Tony & Rhodey) or family relationships (i.e. Thor & Loki), not romances. Most of the romances are bland at best. Ant-man‘s romance didn’t even manage to qualify as bland: it was so minor and added so little to the film that it would have been better to leave it out entirely.

However eye-rolling it was, the romance was so minor it doesn’t really deserve to have the longest paragraph in this review. My bigger beef with the film was that it sidelined Hope (and almost completely erased Jan), who was experienced and competent, in favor of (essentially) a random guy off the streets. This is not exactly an uncommon trope, but it felt especially irritating in light of the continuing failure of Marvel to make a Black Widow movie, or any movie with a female protagonist, until Captain Marvel, which isn’t projected to be released until 2018.

Overall, I’d put Ant-man about on par with Thor as an intro solo film (though lacking the benefit of a virtuoso performance comparable to Tom Hiddleston’s Loki) – enjoyable, but not something I’m likely to rewatch over and over.

My rating:3 Stars (3 / 5)

Inside Out Movie Review

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Review:

After 2013’s disappointing Monsters University, it’s great to see Pixar back to form in Inside Out. While I don’t think Inside Out reached the heights of Monsters Inc. or Finding Nemo, it’s smart, creative, charming, and moving, just like all Pixar’s best works.

The film takes place mostly inside the head of an 11 year old girl named Riley. Five emotions – Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust – live inside her brain’s control center and help Riley navigate life. Riley’s a lucky little girl with a happy and loving family, and up until this point, Joy has mostly been in charge, but after the family moves from Minnesota to San Francisco, Riley struggles with the transition and the emotions start to panic due to the repeated failure of their attempts to keep Riley as happy as they believe she deserves to be. In the ensuing chaos, Joy and Sadness are accidentally sucked out of the control center and into Long-Term Memory, where they’re unable to help Riley cope. Taken over by Fear, Disgust, and Anger, Riley’s happy life starts to fall apart.

There are lots of funny moments in Inside Out (many of my favorites were the brief glimpses into the control centers of other characters, including Riley’s mom and dad, her teacher, and a dog and cat on the street) and it’s ultimately a feel-good film, but it also deals with some weightier issues than most Pixar films, including an attempt to run away from home and a very effective visual metaphor for depression, so I think older children will get more out of it than younger children. In fact, I think it could be really helpful for older children, because it offers a safe framework to talk about feelings (via the personified emotions in the control center) and some valuable lessons about how important “negative” emotions (especially sadness) can be to our physical and emotional health, yet at the same time, how dangerous it is to be controlled exclusively by them. As someone who, like Riley, had a really happy and loving childhood yet struggled with depression beginning around age 11 or 12, I found myself wondering if a movie like this could have helped me understand and express more clearly what was happening to me back then. Maybe it would have helped and maybe not – loving as they are, my family does Emotionally Repressed WASP like champions, and I’m no exception. But I definitely don’t think it would have hurt.

My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

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Mad Max: Fury Road Movie Review

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Review:

Note: This review contains spoilers.

Wowie zowie, counting Cinderella and Age of Ultron, I’ve now seen THREE movies in theaters this year, which may be more than I’ve seen in the previous three years combined. It’s tough getting to the theater when you have a toddler and no babysitter! However, now that he’s in daycare three days a week it’s a lot easier, even though I still feel kind of weird going to the movies in the morning.

Cinderella was a treat for my daughter and Age of Ultron went without saying, thanks to my current Marvel obsession, but Mad Max: Fury Road I went to see for political reasons. I’ve never seen the original Mad Max or either of its other sequels and the trailers for the current sequel/reboot looked weird in a way that was off-putting to me, so before its release I really had no intention of seeing it at all, let alone shelling out seven bucks to see it in theaters. But then the film opened, and people started saying stuff like this about it:

I didn’t expect to see the best female character in an action movie I’ve seen in over a decade.

(Source)

the heroic characters in fury road are literally–LITERALLY, I’M NOT IN ANY WAY EXAGGERATING–fifteen women and tom hardy. i can’t believe this is a movie i saw with my eyes in the year of our lord 2015.

(Source)

The most violent death in the movie was the death of the Bechdel Test, which they dragged behind the car the entire time.

(Source)

The whole movie is about a group of women fleeing toxic patriarchy only to realize that the only way to escape is to topple that system.

(Source)

I like to vote with my pocketbook for stuff, and better female representation in film (especially action and sff) is something I feel pretty strongly about, so clearly I needed to re-evaluate my previous stance on seeing the film!

In fact, Hollywood, I’m going to say this explicitly, just to be sure I’m not misunderstood: I decided to spend $7 bucks to see Mad Max: Fury Road in theaters despite originally having almost zero interest in it because you gave us a movie with a badass female lead who was never sexualized or thrust into an unnecessary romance or love triangle, as well as so many supporting female characters that the Bechdel Test became completely irrelevant. Thank you. I honestly didn’t think you had it in you.

Though I wouldn’t describe Mad Max: Fury Road as groundbreakingly feminist, it hit a lot of feminist notes dead-on in a way that threw many other films and TV shows into kind of stark relief for how much worse they are. For example, one of the things that stood out to me, as someone currently trying to decide whether I want to continue watching Game of Thrones or not in light of its tone-deaf treatment of rape as a trope, was the fact that even though the film makes it 100% clear that the “wives” (several – possibly all? – of whom are pregnant by the revolting Immortan Joe) are escaping a life of sexual slavery and rape and will be subjected to more of the same if they return, their abuse is never shown onscreen and thus is never made titillating or voyeuristic in the way violence – especially sexualized violence – against women so often is in Game of Thrones and (to be fair) many, many other films and TV shows.

Moreover, although the women are treated as objects by Immortan Joe and the other male leaders of the Citadel – and they rebel explicitly against this treatment with the repeated line “We are not things” – the film also balances this treatment of its female characters by making it clear that men are also used as objects. Max himself is literally used as a living blood bag for part of the movie, and though the “warboys” might initially seem to have higher status than either Max or the wives, it’s clear that they are, in fact, regarded as nothing but cannon fodder by the higher status men. As The Verge points out, “When [warboy] Nux encounters the “wives,” they’re the ones who end up trying to help him — not because of women’s civilizing influence, but because they already understand how rigged the system is.”

Aside from the refreshingly feminist themes of the film (bonus points for the subtler environmentalist messages as well), the action scenes were also fucking incredible. The movie is essentially an extended car chase and it reaches new and impressive heights in the art of controlled chaos. As Unfogged points out (I recommend the whole post, which also includes a funny smackdown of the MRA boycott of the film):

The new Mad Max movie may be the most guy movie ever made. The plot is literally Tom Hardy (Mad Max) and Charlize Theron (Furiosa) rescue scantily-clad supermodels. If you asked me when I was 15 to list movie ideas, the list would have gone something like: scantily-clad supermodels, 18 wheelers, guys getting shot, guys getting blown up, fist-fights on top of an 18 wheeler, guys with chainsaws, guys getting run over by 18 wheelers, guys with guitars that shoot fire, and cars crashing into 18 wheelers and blowing up. This list is basically the script for Mad Max: Fury Road. The only thing missing is a helicoper piloted by velociraptors crashing into an 18 wheeler. But there’s always the chance of a sequel.

Though probably not to the degree of a 15 year old guy, as a woman with a weakness for the Rule of Cool, this is the sort of movie that makes me really wish I had design skills – any design skills – because my god, does it look like the design team had fun. Kudos on the awesomely spiky demon cars in particular, though the flame throwing guitar should not be overlooked. The cinematography was also stunningly beautiful, especially the scene as they’re racing towards the dust storm.

On the less pleasant side of things, there was some pretty gross body horror stuff, which is largely what originally turned me off the film after seeing the trailer. I don’t handle body horror very well at all, and there were a couple scenes that made me cringe and hide behind my hands.

Other than that, my only complaint about the film was that there were some poor music choices. Mad Max: Fury Road has relatively little dialogue and a couple of the few scenes with anything approaching a monologue had rather melodramatic music that made the lines seem way more on-the-nose than they would have with something a little subtler and more understated.

The lack of dialogue does, however, give lots of opportunities for some pretty impressive acting with body language and eyes, something I’ve become more attuned to since being bowled over by Sebastian Stan’s work in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Both Hardy and Theron are equally impressive here.

Overall, one of the best action films I’ve seen.

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My rating:4 Stars (4 / 5)

More commentary I’ve enjoyed:

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Avengers: Age of Ultron Movie Review

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Review:

Note: This review contains spoilers.

Avengers: Age of Ultron continues the Marvel Cinematic Universe‘s string of really watchable and entertaining superhero films, but had more serious problems than its predecessor, The Avengers.

Age of Ultron picks up about a year after Captain America: The Winter Soldier, with the Avengers attacking a HYDRA base where Baron Strucker has been hiding Loki’s magical scepter from the first Avengers film, as well as practicing human experimentation in an attempt to create more “Enhanced” humans with special powers. The Avengers successfully recapture the scepter, but Tony Stark gets whammied by Scarlet Witch, one of Strucker’s Enhanced, and decides to use it to create an artificial intelligence to protect the world from alien attacks like that on New York in the first Avengers movie. Precisely how he manages to convince Dr. Banner that this is a good idea remains somewhat unclear to me, but needless to say, it all goes to hell when the artificial intelligence – Ultron – gets online and promptly decides that the only way to really bring peace to Earth is to get rid of the Avengers and most of humanity.

Not a great plan, Tony.

Not surprisingly, given that we are talking about a Marvel film written by Joss Whedon, the highlights of the film were the impressive action sequences and the snappy dialogue. The opening attack against Strucker’s base in Sokovia had blatantly obvious CGI and green screen shots and was a little disappointing, but most of the others were outstanding. I particularly enjoyed the battle between Hulk and the Hulk Buster “Veronica,” which had a lot of funny remarks by Tony, and the final battle, which was full of spectacular visuals, especially the circular shot as the Avengers defended the core.

Whee!

Joss being Joss, there were also lots of laugh out loud lines throughout. He’s a master of snark and I love snark.

My biggest problem with the film was that, unlike the first Avengers film, it seemed like a placeholder rather than a natural progression. The Avengers tied together the various threads of the solo movies from Phase 1 and brought everyone together into the Avengers Initiative; Age of Ultron just seemed like it was filling in while we wait for Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War. It kind of rehashed Cap’s character development in The Winter Soldier (and not as well or as subtly), and Tony Stark’s in Iron Man 3 as well. Any development Tony went through in the course of Age of Ultron itself was more or less negated because he made his biggest mistake while whammied by Scarlet Witch and was then vindicated by Thor when he tried to repeat the same fucking thing that got them an Ultron problem in the first place. (How he got Banner to go along with the same terrible idea TWICE is even more of a mystery to me.)

In a minor preview of Civil War, Tony and Cap fight when Cap catches Tony trying to create the SECOND artificial intelligence, but as soon as Thor steps in in support of Tony, they’re all buddy-buddy again despite the fact that Tony went behind the team’s back not once but TWICE and in the process created something that literally tried to extinguish humanity. Like, what? It could have been a perfect set up for Civil War and instead we got Cap joking about whether an elevator could lift Mjolnir (which, yeah, funny, but still) and telling Tony he’ll miss him.

The only real progression identifiable at this point is the apparent resurrection of S.H.I.E.L.D (which, after the events of The Winter Soldier, Cap goes along with why, exactly?) and the creation of Cap and Black Widow’s New Avengers, but both of these take place at the very end, and aren’t really tied in with the rest of the movie much at all, unlike in The Avengers, where the creation of the original Avengers team was the entire point of the film.

Other notes:

  • Wow, I really, really hated the Bruce/Natasha. Egad. I went in determined to be open-minded about it, because despite being a Clint/Natasha shipper, I am also a multishipper and am rarely truly OTP about my OTPs (I love me some Steve/Bucky/Natasha, for one) but man. It was written horribly, from their actual dialogue together to the blatant lampshading by Cap and Laura, and it dragged down every scene it was in.
  • Bruce and Natasha’s characterization in general was a total mess. Bruce himself (as opposed to Hulk, who did have that great fight with Veronica) existed only as Tony’s doormat and Natasha’s love interest in this film. Natasha had more evidence of personality than that, at least, and despite Scarlet Johansson’s pregnancy during filming, she also had several great action scenes, most notably the one where she saved the whole world by stealing Vision’s body from Ultron. So at least we got that much. But far too much of her screentime was taken up by her pursuit of Bruce, which might have been okay if it had been better written, but instead landed her with several lines that made me actually groan out loud with how awful they were. So that sucked, because Bruce and Natasha are two of my favorite characters and I thought Joss wrote them both pretty well in The Avengers, so I really wasn’t expecting them to be so awful in Age of Ultron.
  • It was especially ironic given that Joss’s stated reasoning for not doing Clint/Natasha (as Marvel apparently originally planned) was because he wanted to show that men and women could have platonic friendships. But Natasha already has a well written and close platonic friendship with a man in the MCU. With Cap. In Captain America: The Winter Soldier it’s pretty obvious there’s some attraction between the two of them, at least on his part (the bikini line, his reaction to the kiss on the escalator, etc.) and she essentially offers herself to him in the car with her line about “Who do you want me to be?” But when he says “How about a friend?” they make a mutual decision to be friends, and personally, I thought it worked wonderfully for both characters. Far better than the blatant and totally unsubtle “Oh, and by the way this is Clint Barton, my BEST FRIEND” business in Age of Ultron.
  • I don’t even know what was going on with Thor. His storyline seemed like it got A LOT cut out of it and was kind of confusing and disjointed as a result. However, I did love his interactions with Cap in particular – adorable! And they had some really cool moves together with the shield and the hammer.
  • It was nice to see Clint get so much more to do, given that he spent most of The Avengers brainwashed. He had some great lines and I liked how he kind of took the twins under his wing.
  • Laura was a pretty bland and generic Supportive Wife, but she wasn’t actively offensive like the Bruce/Natasha, so I was okay with it, although all the stuff at Clint’s farm seemed a little unnecessary and more like (yet another) blatant statement that CLINT AND NATASHA ARE NOT TOGETHER, OKAY? rather than anything actually relevant or useful to either plot or characterization. I’m baffled why Joss Whedon fought to keep the farm scenes in the film, since they really didn’t add anything to the story that couldn’t have been accomplished in other ways, especially since it came at the cost of cutting out so much of Thor’s subplot that what was left made little sense.
  • Also, Pepper Potts on a farm? Really, Tony? Are you even listening to the words coming out of your mouth?
  • For that matter, I don’t 100% understand why Cap and Tony were so crazy about the farm at all, given that they’re from Brooklyn and Manhattan respectively. On the other hand, it did give us the spectacle of Cap chopping wood in a tight t-shirt (and ripping a log in half with his bare hands) so I ain’t complaining too much.

  • I was pretty meh about Vision on the whole, but the hammer reveal was well done and got gasps in my theater, including from me, despite being spoiled in advance.
  • I ended up liking the Maximoff twins quite a lot and hope we’ll see more of both of them.
  • I also liked Ultron quite a bit. He was much funnier than I expected.
  • I’m glad the hammer wobbled for Cap. I think he probably could pick it up if he really wanted to.
  • I heard about the running “language” gag before seeing the film and was deeply confused, because Cap was in the fucking Army, you can’t tell me he doesn’t swear. Joss has tended to write Cap in the past as if he has a really big stick up his ass – a stick nowhere in evidence in his solo films (I think he may actually be the character who’s sworn most onscreen in the entire MCU) – so I thought it might be more of the same but it worked better onscreen than I expected because Tony’s reaction (and Cap’s embarrassed response to his teasing) implied that he was surprised Cap said it because Cap actually swears all the fucking time. Which is much more in line with my headcanon! (There’s a funny ficlet offering one plausible explanation for why Cap said it in the first place.)
  • Also, did Whedon imply Cap is a Yankees fan? Are you kidding me? I don’t even follow baseball, but even I know a Brooklynite from the 30’s would cut out his own tongue and eat it for dinner before saying anything complimentary about the Yankees.
  • Overall, though, I thought Cap was better written than he was in The Avengers, although the lack of Bucky was glaring at a couple points. It was never really explained why Cap was taking down HYDRA with the Avengers while Falcon was off looking for Bucky, given that it was the exact opposite of Cap’s stated priorities at the end of The Winter Soldier. It also seemed odd to me that his vision from Scarlet Witch was focused on his PTSD and inability to leave the war behind, neither of which is really much of a revelation for anyone who watched The Avengers or The Winter Soldier. Or for him, either, I don’t think. (Though maybe that’s why he had so much less of a reaction to his vision than the others did to theirs?) Given that the visions seemed to focus on fears and regrets, I would have liked to see some reference to the fact that he just recently discovered his best friend in the world spent 70 years being tortured, brainwashed, and used as a killing machine, even if they couldn’t get Sebastian Stan for any new footage.
  • Also re: Cap’s vision, it was a little weird to me that the vision suggested that Peggy thought either one of them would ever be capable of leaving the war – she certainly didn’t leave it, as we saw in Agent Carter and with her founding of S.H.I.E.L.D. However, I’m not gonna lie, that beautiful, happy smile Cap gave her as they started to dance made my heart melt.
  • I was so happy to see the Jewish tech guy from The Winter Soldier who wouldn’t send up the helicarriers that I squeaked loudly enough to get a funny look from my neighbor.
  • The Winter Soldier was essentially a political thriller with superheroes and I didn’t really go into Age of Ultron expecting it to be as politically astute as that, but dammit, I expected more than we got! Tony’s desire for “a suit of armor around the world” has so many implications given the current debates (both in the real world and in the MCU) about freedom vs security, the military-industrial complex (I’m old enough that I immediately thought “Strategic Defense Initiative,” and Tony and Bruce are BOTH older than I am, so did that expensive clusterfuck just not happen in the Marvel universe?), and American hegemony, yet the implications were barely explored. Cap had one good line about the futility of pre-emptive war and that was about it.
  • I liked that the Avengers repeatedly made efforts to evacuate civilians to safety. It seemed like a deliberate thumbing of the nose at DC’s Man of Steel, and it definitely made them more sympathetic by comparison.
  • It’s pretty cool that the New Avengers are two black men, two women, an artificial intelligence, and Cap. Much more balanced than the original lineup. 🙂

Overall, a highly entertaining film, but it lacked some of the depth and heart of previous outings in the Marvel universe.

And now the wait for Captain America: Civil War begins!

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My rating:3.5 Stars (3.5 / 5)

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